Diamond Certified Company Report

Gingrich Horticulture Service

Diamond Certified Company Report

Gingrich Horticulture Service

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CUSTOMER SATISFACTION i
Customer LOYALTY i
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Phone SURVEY RESPONSES FROM 200 VERIFIED CUSTOMERS i

David W.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

1 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I just used them for removing a gopher, and they did a good job.

They were able to do what I wanted them to do and in a easy manner. I didn't have to keep calling them back. It worked wonderfully for me.

Claire F.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

2 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They go the extra mile. They made an error and billed me after I had paid. When I informed them of the error, they personally called me and apologized for having made the error, which I though was above and beyond.

They're really honest, they have integrity, and they do good work.

Lillian G.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

3 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I've recommended them to friends and they do a good job. We live in an area that is subject to mold, and I'm happy with their service.

Whether I'm actually here or not when they come, I've never had a problem. When I have been here I've asked questions and they've always been very polite and thorough. They've helped me to understand what's realistic and what isn't. We've used them for several years and we've been very happy with the service.

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Diamond certified VIDEO PROFILE
Diamond certified company PROFILE

Dianne and John Gingrich are committed to customer satisfaction.

Gingrich Horticulture Service utilizes a variety of integrated pest management (IPM) techniques to create sustainable garden environments for residential and commercial clients throughout Central Contra Costa County. In addition to controlling insects, gophers, moles, voles, yellow jackets and ground squirrels, the company provides lawn, tree, shrub, and ground cover care that includes weed control and lawn core aerations.

President John Gingrich says Gingrich Horticulture Service’s customer-oriented business approach has been an important part of its ongoing success. “Our goal is to give every client their money’s worth, and if they don’t feel that way, we want to know about it. We’re very knowledgeable about the technical aspects of the industry, and we utilize our expertise to develop thriving, beautiful landscapes.”

Gingrich Horticulture Service is known for its focus on plant health care, which includes fertilizing each plant based on its specific needs and making sure its surrounding environment is optimal for longterm success. “We work hard to make sure every plant is as happy and healthy as possible,” affirms Mr. Gingrich. “Whether that means eliminating pests or using environmentally-friendly materials, we’re always looking for the best ways to optimize the health of our customers’ plants.”

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DIAMOND CERTIFIED RESEARCHED CAPABILITIES ON Gingrich Horticulture Service

COMPANY CONTACT
Service AREA

Central Contra Costa County

SERVICES PERFORMED

Insect & Disease Control
Nutrient Management for Lawns, Trees & Shrubs
Weed Control
Gophers, Moles, Voles, Yellow Jackets & Ground Squirrels

DIAMOND CERTIFIED RESEARCHED ARTICLES ON Gingrich Horticulture Service

John Gingrich inspects a customer’s plant.

Company Profile

Gingrich Horticulture Service utilizes a variety of integrated pest management (IPM) techniques to create sustainable garden environments for residential and commercial clients throughout Central Contra Costa County. In addition to controlling insects, gophers, moles, voles, yellow jackets and ground squirrels, the company provides lawn, tree, shrub, and ground cover care that includes weed control and lawn core aerations.

President John Gingrich says Gingrich Horticulture Service’s customer-oriented business approach has been an important part of its ongoing success. “Our goal is to give every client their money’s worth, and if they don’t feel that way, we want to know about it. We’re very knowledgeable about the technical aspects of the industry, and we utilize our expertise to develop thriving, beautiful landscapes.”

Gingrich Horticulture Service is known for its focus on plant health care, which includes fertilizing each plant based on its specific needs and making sure its surrounding environment is optimal for longterm success. “We work hard to make sure every plant is as happy and healthy as possible,” affirms Mr. Gingrich. “Whether that means eliminating pests or using environmentally-friendly materials, we’re always looking for the best ways to optimize the health of our customers’ plants.”

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Company Philosophy

“We take the extra effort to make sure our clients are happy, and that's the way our business has been since the beginning. We have a deep knowledge base when it comes to maintaining healthy gardens, and we utilize that experience to provide high-quality results on every job.”

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Comparative Summary

Maintaining customer satisfaction is a crucial aspect of any business, but it’s even more important for pest control companies that have earned the prestigious Diamond Certified award. For Gingrich Horticulture Service, the key to achieving and maintaining high levels of customer satisfaction is simple: utilize its industry knowledge and experience to take on complicated problems that many companies aren’t qualified to handle. “We mainly serve home and property owners, but our expertise is so unmatched that we’re often sought out by other professionals as well,” says owner John Gingrich. “Whether it’s a tree company that needs help diagnosing a disease or a gardener who needs help dealing with a pest problem, we’re the company that others call to solve difficult problems.”

Gingrich Horticulture Service has been using integrated pest management (IPM) techniques to create sustainable garden environments for residential and commercial clients throughout Central Contra Costa County since 1999. In addition to controlling insects, gophers, moles, voles, yellow jackets, ground squirrels and other pests, the company provides lawn, tree, shrub, and ground cover care services that include weed control and lawn core aeration.

Unlike less experienced pest control companies that rely heavily on pesticides and have a negative impact on the environment as a result, Gingrich Horticulture Service takes an integrated approach that regards pesticides as a last resort. “We never use pesticides as the first line of attack; rather, we employ all our resources to come up with natural, environmentally-friendly solutions,” says Mr. Gingrich. “Whether that means amending the amount of fertilizer being applied to the soil or correcting an improper watering issue, our goal is to fix the problem at its root before resorting to more aggressive tactics.”

Another distinguishing attribute of Gingrich Horticulture Service is its readiness to educate both its customers and their service professionals. “Everyone who works here has a passion for teaching, so we spend a lot of time educating our clients about our methods and the reasoning behind them,” explains Mr. Gingrich. “We’re also happy to work with their gardeners or landscapers to teach them the proper ways to deal with pests and plant diseases.”

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Industry Info

If you need to deal with pests in your garden, consider the benefits of integrated pest management. Distinguished by its emphasis on environmentally-conscious solutions, integrated pest management (IPM) is steadily gaining popularity among consumers and professionals alike. Unlike traditional pest control methods that seek to “wipe out” pest populations, IPM takes a more ecologically responsible approach by employing less aggressive methods at the outset.

One of the primary motives for IPM’s less aggressive stance is to avoid the negative side effects of traditional pesticide application. Besides airborne contamination from chemical spraying, traditional methods often result in beneficial insects being exterminated along with the pests, which can lead to long-term consequences for a garden or landscape. Additionally, pest populations tend to develop a resistance to chemical products over time, requiring more intensive measures on the part of pest control professionals. By deferring the use of pesticides until completely necessary, as well as limiting the scope of their impact, IPM seeks to circumvent such problems.

One common strategy employed by IPM is to alter particular elements of the environment where the pest infestation is taking place. “In many instances, a pest infestation is being caused by one or more factors which, if addressed, can correct the problem without the use of pesticides,” says John Gingrich, owner of Gingrich Horticulture Service in Concord. “For example, if too much fertilizer is being used, it may be causing too much growth, which can make a garden more susceptible to diseases or insects. Even over- or under-watering can be a causal factor. With an IPM approach, a pest control professional can look for the base cause of the problem and seek to correct it without using pesticides.”

Even when pesticides are deemed a necessary measure, the IPM approach is unique from traditional methodology. “In the past, a pest control company might spray an entire yard, but companies that utilize IPM take a more targeted approach,” says Mr. Gingrich. “When you spray an entire yard, you end up killing a lot of beneficial insects and soil bacteria that are actually working in your favor. By taking a targeted approach, you can really zero in on the problem.”

One example of this targeted approach is a prominent industry method known as tree injection. Instead of simply spraying a tree’s crown, the materials are injected directly into the vascular system of the tree through an intravenous device. This enables pest control professionals to treat trees for disease or infestation without cross contamination from airborne chemicals.

According to Mr. Gingrich, with ongoing industry innovation, professionals who take an IPM approach will have more tools like tree injection at their disposal in the future. “Tree injection has been around for a long time, but more products and materials are being developed that will improve our ability to target pests while reducing our environmental impact.”

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Frequently Asked Questions

Q: How soon can you start my job?

A: It depends on how busy we are and whether we have a technician in your area. Sometimes people will call us with a gopher issue and we’ll happen to have a specialist in their area that can swing by later that afternoon. Other times, we may not be able to come until the following day or later in the week. Either way, we’re very responsive in our communication and do our best to start each job as soon as possible.

Q: What types of pests do you deal with?

A: We primarily handle exterior pests such as gophers, moles and rats. We can even handle birds if they’re a problem in your garden. We don’t deal with structural pests like termites.

Q: Do you use organic pest control products?

A: No. In most cases, organic products simply don’t control pests and plant diseases to the level that our customers expect. That being said, the products we use are very low-impact and still achieve the desired results.

Q: Can you treat large trees?

A: Yes. We use sophisticated methods like intravenous tree injection to target pests and diseases without harming beneficial factions.

Q: Do you offer free estimates?

A: It depends. We’ll provide free estimates for landscaping projects, but if it’s just a garden consultation, we have to charge.

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SELECTED PHOTOS FROM Gingrich Horticulture Service

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DIAMOND CERTIFIED EXPERT CONTRIBUTOR ADVICE & TIPS FROM John Gingrich

Expert CONTRIBUTOR PROFILE
  • John Gingrich is a veteran of the horticulture industry and owner of Gingrich Horticulture Service, a Diamond Certified company. He can be reached at (925) 979-5913 or by email.

John Gingrich: Plant Doctor

By James Florence, Diamond Certified Resource Reporter

CONCORD — From an early age, John Gingrich knew he wanted to be in a profession that would allow him to spend his days outside, working with plants and nature. While he assumed this would mean a career in landscaping, he eventually discovered a niche that held an even greater appeal. “After working as a landscaper for several years, I decided I wanted to stand out a little more in the field, so I enrolled at Cal Poly as an ornamental horticulture major,” he explains. “That’s when I really began to cultivate my interest in landscape health care.”

Following his college stint, John moved to the Concord area, where he applied his education by working for a local company. Fifteen years later, he struck out on his own and founded Gingrich Horticulture Service in 1999. Today, John continues to use his expert knowledge of horticultural health to assist Contra Costa County residents. “Our aim is to keep plants healthy, vigorous and growing to their full potential,” he says. “A lot of people install plants in their yards but don’t really understand what those plants need. That’s where we come in.”

A longtime resident of Concord (where he lives with his wife and business partner, Diane), John says the Bay Area’s temperate weather makes it an ideal environment for someone in his line of work. “An area’s climate dictates what kinds of plants can be grown there, so we’re very fortunate to be in an area that allows for such versatility. From plants that require winter chilling to subtropicals like citruses and guavas, it’s fun having such a vast horticultural pallet to choose from.”

Outside of work, John extends his love of the outdoors to a variety of pursuits, from hiking and camping to water- and snow-skiing. “I enjoy just about any activity that I can do outdoors, especially water sports like diving for abalones and spearfishing.” In addition to these active pastimes, John enjoys avocational hobbies like raising honeybees and making wine. “My wife tells me I have too many hobbies,” he laughs. However, as busy as his work and hobbies keep him, he also makes sure to keep up with his and Diane’s two children, Ian and Ashley, who are pursuing their respective vocational goals in college.

When asked about a personal philosophy, John quotes a verse of Biblical scripture: “Let your yes be yes and your no be no.” “As a consumer, when I hire somebody, I look to see if they’re going to deliver what they’ve promised,” he explains. “That’s something I really try to live by—not only to do what I say I’m going to, but to do it to the best of my abilities.”

When asked the first thing he’d do if he could retire tomorrow, John says he’d take a trip down under. “I’d probably go visit my son, who’s currently attending a university in Australia. Also, my wife is from Australia, so it would be a chance for us to spend some time with her family as well.”

Ask Me Anything!

Q: What’s your favorite local restaurant?
A: Naan ‘n’ Curry in Concord.

Q: What’s your earliest memory?
A: Swimming in my family’s Doughboy pool while Jeffrey, our German Shepherd, ran around and barked at us.

Q: Are you an early bird or a night owl?
A: An early bird. I like being up in the quiet of the morning.

Q: What’s your favorite thing to eat for breakfast?
A: Eggs Benedict with lox.

Q: Do you collect anything?
A: Boats. I have two sailboats and a fishing boat, not to mention four kayaks.

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Expert articles
  • A Consideration for Plant Selection

    CONCORD — Consumers have a tendency to think bigger is better, and this is no exception when it comes to shopping for plants at a nursery. That’s why, when selecting among plants of a similar species, most people are likely to assume the biggest, most developed one is the best deal. However, this isn’t necessarily the case.

    When it comes to plant selection, it’s not always best to go with the biggest plant. Often, larger plants in a nursery setting grow too large for their containers, which makes them more likely to be root-bound, with roots tightly amassed and circling around the base. When a plant is root-bound in its container, this can hinder its success after being transplanted. In contrast, a smaller, less developed plant will be more appropriately sized for its container and therefore less likely to be root-bound.

    If you bring a plant home and find that it’s root-bound, be sure to address the problem before putting it into the ground. By trimming and/or loosening tightly bound roots before planting, they’ll be better able to take in nutrients from the soil, which will give the plant a better chance to succeed.

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  • Identifying and Treating Fire Blight in Trees

    CONCORD — Fire blight is a growing concern among Bay Area property owners. It’s a bacterial disease that affects both ornamental and fruiting varieties of pear and apple trees (along with several other closely-related plants), and it’s so named because of the burnt appearance it gives to the affected areas of a plant.

    Fire blight can be spread a number of ways. One major carrier is honeybees, which inadvertently carry it on their feet and transfer it to flowers during spring pollination. The disease can then progress from that flower into the plant tissue, moving down from the tops of the trees into the bigger branches.

    The main way to prevent the further dissemination of fire blight is to prune it out as soon as it’s spotted. When pruning an affected branch, cut at least six to eight inches below the point of visible infection to make sure no bacteria remains. Sometimes, you may need to go a bit beyond that just to make a proper cut on the branch. Also, to avoid cross-contamination, use either a high-alcohol disinfectant or a 10 percent bleach solution to sterilize your clippers between each cut. Don’t forget to sterilize the clippers one last time when you’re finished—that way, you can be sure to start with a clean blade next time you prune.

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  • 3 Aspects of Lawn Care

    CONCORD – If you have a lawn, you’ll want to keep it as lush and healthy-looking as possible. To do this, you’ll need to address three critical aspects of lawn care: mowing, watering and fertilizing.

    1. Mowing
    Anyone with a lawn knows the importance of regular mowing, but one aspect that’s often overlooked is proper lawn height. The height to which you mow your lawn should depend upon the type of grass it’s composed of. For example, a bluegrass lawn is best mowed to about two and a half inches, whereas tall fescue should be mowed to three to four inches. In regard to mower selection, a rotary mower is the best choice: it has a very fast blade and can be easily adjusted, resulting in a nice, clean cut.

    2. Watering
    Correct lawn watering comes down to two key aspects: timing and amount. In regard to the first, it’s best to water in the early morning. Watering is most effective during this time of day because the lack of direct sunlight means there’s less evaporation, which allows more water to penetrate the soil.

    To determine if your lawn is receiving an adequate amount of water, use this simple test: Go to one of the brown spots on your lawn and stick a 6-inch screwdriver into the soil. If the screwdriver only goes in halfway, it means the water isn’t getting down deep enough into the soil. In this case, you’ll need to either increase the water amount or adjust your sprinklers to get better coverage of the area. On the other hand, if the screwdriver goes in all the way to the handle, this indicates an adequate level of soil moisture.

    3. Fertilization
    Regularly applied fertilizer thickens turf density, which makes it harder for weeds like crabgrass, spurge and dandelion to establish themselves. The invigorating effects of fertilizer also help keep harmful diseases and insects at bay. Recommended frequency of fertilizer application will vary depending upon the needs of your particular lawn type. For example, bluegrass requires at least seven to eight feedings a year, while tall fescue requires six to seven.

    By proactively addressing these three aspects of maintenance, you’ll be able to keep your lawn healthy and beautiful all year round.

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  • How to Plant a Tree

    CONCORD − Planting a tree on your property may seem like a simple task: dig a hole, put in the tree and refill the hole. However, to ensure a healthy transplant, it’s important to know some of the nuances involved in the process. Consider the following tips for correct tree planting procedure:

    Dig an appropriately sized hole. Your hole should be just deep enough to house the tree’s root ball while about twice as wide as its diameter. A wide hole will ensure the soil surrounding the roots is soft and loose, which will give them room to develop. However, while additional width is good for a new tree, additional depth is not. Since a tree settles a bit after its initial planting, if you plant it too deep to begin with, it will end up being even deeper, which can leave its base vulnerable to rot. For this reason, when you set the tree into the hole, make sure its root crown is at or just above the soil level.

    Avoid loose soil. Once your tree is in place, begin back-filling the hole around it, tamping the soil as you go. You don’t want the soil to be too loose after planting, as the air pockets will create dry spots where the roots can’t grow. A little water can also help settle the soil.

    Don’t amend the soil. It may come as a surprise, but when transplanting a new tree, you should resist the urge to add soil amendments like fertilizer. It has been proven that a plant develops a better root system more quickly when no amendments are added at first planting.

    Add mulch. While soil amendments are discouraged, one thing you should do after planting your new tree is add a two- to four-inch layer of mulch around it. This will help the soil hold in moisture and moderate its temperature. However, be sure to leave space between the mulch and the tree’s trunk, as mulch up against the trunk can lead to rot.

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Expert video tip
  • Video: Dealing with Lawn Grubs

    Complete Video Transcription:

    CONCORD — Host, Sarah Rutan: If you’re having a problem with raccoons tearing up your lawn, you may not realize the true root of the issue. To learn more, we’re in Concord with B.J. Walker of Gingrich Horticulture Service, speaking on behalf of Diamond Certified Expert Contributor John Gingrich.

    B.J. Walker: As a homeowner you have may noticed in your lawn or your neighbors’ lawns huge sections ripped up by raccoons. The root of the problem is a white grub. The white grub is an insect larva of a beetle that chews up the root of the grass. What this does is it makes the grass, your established turf, come up like brand new laid sod. It pulls right up off of the surface, and that’s where you’ll find the grubs. So, to check you can pull up the grass and look for the grubs just underneath the surface.

    So, to get rid of them the easiest time is actually back in June when the eggs are first laid. So, the adults fly around and they lay their eggs, and you need to put your treatment down before the eggs are laid. When the eggs hatch it’s the easiest time to kill the grubs. It’s when they’re most vulnerable. The best time to deal with the grub issues is in June. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

    So, if you find yourself in fall with a torn up lawn from raccoons, the best thing to do is go in and treat, but then the raccoons will keep coming back. They’ll keep coming back and eat dead grubs, and they’ll keep coming back to check for grubs even after you’ve killed them. So, what you need to do is piece back together your lawn, treat for the grubs, and then use either fruit tree netting or a shade netting or a shade cloth, stake it down in the sections that are getting ripped up, and this will prevent the raccoons from physically pulling up the lawn. What this will do is give the grass time to reestablish its root system and hopefully come back and look great next year.

    Host, Sarah Rutan: To learn more from local, top rated companies, visit our Diamond Certified Expert Reports at experts.diamondcertified.org.

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  • Video: Tree Selection

    Complete Video Transcription:

    CONCORD – Host, Sarah Rutan: When selecting a new tree to install on your property, there are some important things you should look for. Today we’re in Concord with Diamond Certified Expert Contributor John Gingrich of Gingrich Horticulture Services to learn more.

    Diamond Certified Expert Contributor, John Gingrich of Gingrich: Hi. I wanted to talk today about planting and selecting quality plants and how to properly put them in the ground. First of all, as far as selection we’ll start with trees. One of the critical things with trees is you want a tree that can stand on its own without being staked. It’s far preferred than selecting plants that need to be staked. Here’s two trees. One is obviously standing without being staked. They’re nearly the same height, and this one here is nearly the same size at the base of the tree as it is seven foot high. It’s been proven that trees that didn’t need staking at the time of planting develop a stronger root system and a stronger branching structure than trees that have been staked.

    Another critical point when selecting a tree is looking at the root structure. Now, we can’t see much of the root structure, but we can see the very tops of the roots where they flare off of the main trunk. In this tree here, it’s a large tree in a small pot which indicates to me that there may be problems. As I look into the container, I see one of the main roots is growing over to the side of the pot. I suspect it’s going to be wrapped around this pot several times by the size of that root and the size of the pot. This will lead to problems if it’s not trimmed away at the time of planting. This is a much better selection here as far as the root development that I can see. Now, obviously I can’t see what’s under the soil, but I can see the root development here and I don’t see any roots that I suspect to be circled around the base of the trunk.

    So, here’s a good example of a bad tree selection. When I bought this tree it was in a 24 inch box container, and the soil covered the root flare. I didn’t uncover it. I thought it was buried at the proper depth. When I planted it, I planted it a little bit high, and now that the excess soil has washed away from the root crown, I now know why this tree has been failing. You can see these girdling roots growing around and around the trunk. These roots will close off any flow of water or minerals and nutrients up and down the trunk, and it’s killing itself because of the girdling roots at the base.

    Host, Sarah Rutan: To learn more from local, top rated companies, visit our Diamond Certified Expert Reports at experts.diamondcertified.org.

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  • Video: Proper Tree Planting Procedure

    Complete Video Transcription:

    CONCORD – Host, Sarah Rutan: When installing a new tree on your property, knowing the proper procedure can help ensure a healthy acclimation. Today we’re in Concord with Diamond Certified Expert Contributor John Gingrich of Gingrich Horticulture Service to learn more.

    Diamond Certified Expert Contributor, John Gingrich: Hi. Today I want to discuss how to properly plant a tree. First of all, you need to dig a proper hole, and the hole should be as deep as the root ball of the plant. You don’t want to dig it deeper because if you dig a hole too deep, it will settle in the hole after planting, and we don’t want that because it’ll cause problems in time as the soil fills in around the trunk. So, you want to dig the hole as deep as the plant but twice as wide. As the new roots develop you want to give them plenty of nice loose soil to grow into.

    So, I’ve already dug the hole. We’re going to plant the plant. Now I’m looking at the roots in this container. I don’t have any girdling roots, any circling roots in the container, which looks good. I don’t have any roots at the bottom of the container that are circling so I’m going to go ahead and plant this tree. We’ll set it down in the hole, and you’ll notice that the crown of this plant, the root flare, this point right here, is at soil level or just above soil level. If I use a bar across, you can we’re just about an inch or two above this soil level here at its current planting depth. So, that’s exactly right. We always want to make sure that this root crown is above the soil level so that in time soil doesn’t fill back in around the base of the tree. That extra soil will cause rotting here at the base so it’s critical that this be followed.

    When you back fill around the base of the tree, just start putting in the dirt, and you can tamp it in as you go. Using water will also help settle the soil, but you don’t want it too loose because too many air pockets will create dry spots where the roots can’t grow. So, you want to kind of make sure that you limit the amount of open air pockets around the root. You’ll notice that I’m also not using any amendments in this soil. It’s better. Unless you can amend the entire roots on the plant you’re planting, you wouldn’t want to use amendments in the back fill. It’s proven that the plant develops a better root system quicker if you don’t add the amendments.

    So, I finished back filling around the tree, and then it’s a good idea to mulch. The mulching will help moderate the soil temperatures and the adverse conditions of the heat as far as drying. So, the mulch will help with this tree’s development, but when you’re mulching around the tree, you don’t want the mulch up against the trunk like I’m pouring here. You want to make sure that between two to four inches of mulch is applied, but make sure that that mulch is back away from the tree’s trunk again as not to hold any moisture up against the trunk because the moisture will cause rot at the base of the tree. If it rots here, the rest of the tree dies.

    Host, Sarah Rutan: To learn more from local, top rated companies, visit our Diamond Certified Expert Reports at experts.diamondcertified.org.

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  • Video: Plant Selection

    Complete Video Transcription:

    CONCORD – Host, Sarah Rutan: When selecting new plants from a nursery, one factor you should take into account is their pre-installation size. Today we’re in Concord with Diamond Certified Expert Contributor John Gingrich of Gingrich Horticulture Service to learn more.

    Diamond Certified Expert Contributor John Gingrich: When selecting a plant when you go to the nursery, you know the kind of plant you want, and you’re looking at all the plants available in that species. It’s not always the best thing to choose the largest plant that’s available.

    These two plants are both the exact same species. They’re Thuja Emerald Green. Both were available at the same store. This one looks like a better deal. It costs a little bit more than this one, but it’s not necessarily the best choice. This plan is a little bit too large for this one gallon size container. It’s probably a bit root bound where this plant is more appropriately sized for the container. It’s most likely not root bound. Well, even this one we have some circling roots at the base that should be trimmed or at least loosened before we plant it. You can imagine what this one’s going to be like, much more circling roots or just totally root bound. This container is nearly a solid ball of roots. So, this smaller plant is a much better choice. It’s cheaper, and it will develop more quickly in your garden.

    Host, Sarah Rutan: To learn more from local top rated companies, visit our Diamond Certified Expert Reports at experts.diamondcertified.org.

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  • Video: Treating Fire Blight in Trees

    Complete Video Transcription:

    CONCORD — Host, Sarah Rutan: An important part of caring for trees on your property is identifying and treating disease. Today we’re in Concord with Diamond Certified Expert Contributor John Gingrich of Gingrich Horticulture Service to hear about one disease commonly found in the Bay Area.

    Expert Contributor, John Gingrich: This is fire blight. It’s on an ornamental pear tree, but the same disease affects fruiting pears, apples, and ornamental apples such as crabapples and several other closely-related plants.

    The disease is a bacteria. It’s often spread by honeybees in the spring when the plants are flowering. The honeybees inadvertently carry it on their feet, land on the flower, and inadvertently infect that flower. The disease then can progress from that flower down into the plant tissue and it moves down from the tops of the trees down into the bigger branches.

    The main control for this disease is to prune it out before it travels too far. It’s important to make sure that you’ve sterilized your clippers between each cut and you want to make sure you start with a clean set of sheers. So, I’m sterilizing the blade with a just Lysol disinfectant. It can be any high alcohol or a bleach solution. The bleach has to be at least 10% if you’re using bleach.

    We’ve got a sterile set of sheers. So, you can see this was the infection here in this short spur. It’s gone into the branch that it’s connected to, and if I were just to cut this off, I wouldn’t have gotten all the bacteria. I need to cut at least six to eight inches below that point. I went a little bit beyond six to eight inches just to make a proper cut on the branch.

    And remember, it’s important to sterilize your sheers after each cut and it’s also a good idea to sterilize them before you put them away so you know when you pick them up the next time, you’re working with clean tools.

    Host, Sarah Rutan: To learn more from local, top-rated companies visit our Diamond Certified Expert Reports at experts.diamondcertified.org.

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  • Video: 3 Aspects of Lawn Care

    Complete Video Transcription:

    Host, Sarah Rutan: When it comes to keeping your lawn well-maintained, there are three key areas to address. To learn more, we’re in Concord with Pete Gumas of Gingrich Horticulture Service, speaking on behalf of Diamond Certified Expert Contributor John Gingrich.

    Pete Gumas: Hi. We’re here today to talk about lawn care. We’d like to split it up into three portions. It would be mowing at the proper height, watering, and fertilizing. We’ll talk about mowing now. Mowing is important in a lawn, mowing at the proper height. This here is a bluegrass lawn. It’s probably best mowed at about two and a half inches. A rotary mower does the best job at cutting it. A rotary mower has a very fast blade. It cuts it well. Rotary mowers are easily adjustable, and they do a pretty good job with the cut and the lawn looks good after.

    Watering is best when done in the early a.m. because it’s the coolest time of day, the least amount of wind, and the water goes into the soil most efficiently. If you have any brown spots in your lawn, then you can check very easily with just a regular screwdriver with about a five or six inch blade. If you stick it into that brown spot and it only goes in halfway, then you know you have to adjust. You have to either increase the water or adjust your sprinklers to green up that area. If you take that screwdriver and it goes all the way into the handle, you have adequate soil moisture and you’re okay.

    Regular fertilizing keeps your lawn actively growing out of any problems it might have. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, which is a complete fertilizer, thickens turf density and keeps the weeds out and keeps the turf actively growing out of any disease or insect problems it might have. Weeds such as crabgrass, spurge, and dandelion have a tougher time to establish when you have a thicker turf density in your turf. Blue rye requires at least seven to eight feedings a year, year round, about every six weeks. Tall fescue requires about six to seven fertilizings per year and will keep it dense too.

    Host, Sarah Rutan: To learn more from local, top rated companies, visit our Diamond Certified Expert Reports at experts.diamondcertified.org.

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Gingrich Horticulture Service WEBSITE AND EXTERNAL FEED
  • Gingrich Horticulture Service SOCIAL MEDIA FEEDS
COMPANY WEBSITE
www.Gingrichhort.com
Diamond Certified RATINGS ON Gingrich Horticulture Service
Diamond certified ratings dashboard
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION i
Customer LOYALTY i
Helpful Expertise i

Each surveyed customer was asked, “If you needed any helpful expertise, did this company provide that expertise?” To calculate this score, total “Yes” responses were divided by total responses (excluding those that stated they hadn’t needed any expertise).

Company Credentials i
  • Workers Compensation
  • Liability Insurance
  • License Verification
  • Business Practices
  • Current Complaint File
  • Legal & Finance
Phone SURVEY RESPONSES FROM 200 VERIFIED CUSTOMERS i
Gingrich Horticulture Service : Average 8.9 out of 10 based on 200 unique customer surveys of customer satisfaction.

David W.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

1 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I just used them for removing a gopher, and they did a good job.

They were able to do what I wanted them to do and in a easy manner. I didn't have to keep calling them back. It worked wonderfully for me.

Lillian G.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

2 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I've recommended them to friends and they do a good job. We live in an area that is subject to mold, and I'm happy with their service.

Whether I'm actually here or not when they come, I've never had a problem. When I have been here I've asked questions and they've always been very polite and thorough. They've helped me to understand what's realistic and what isn't. We've used them for several years and we've been very happy with the service.

Claire F.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

3 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They go the extra mile. They made an error and billed me after I had paid. When I informed them of the error, they personally called me and apologized for having made the error, which I though was above and beyond.

They're really honest, they have integrity, and they do good work.

Gary K.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

4 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They were effective in solving a difficult squirrel problem at my house.

They know how to attack controlling pests.

Helen W.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

5 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They are reliable.

They are reliable and reasonable.

Stanley R.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

6 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I would definitely recommend them. They came out, did the job, and took care of the problem when I wasn't home.

They are local. I have had luck with smaller companies where the owner's name is on the business, and he is the one doing the work or at least he is very connected to the outcome and who is doing the work. They seem to get the job done.

Tom R.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

7 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They are very well-educated in the art of whatever they are doing.

They are professional and quick.

Sarah J.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

8 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I would recommend them.

They get the job done.

Richard C.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

9 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They are all highly educated, and they know what they are doing.

They are competent in what they do, and we see results.

Philip S.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

10 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They do a very good job.

They did what we hired them to do.

Peter K.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

11 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

It worked.

They seemed to be timely, reliable, and they got the job done.

Paul W.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

12 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I was very impressed with the owner. He gave me lots of information, even beyond the service he was providing.

First of all, the products that he gave me worked, so I got my money's worth.

Allison S.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

13 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They were effective in catching our pests. They were friendly and helpful in explaining what they were doing.

Mainly that they removed the pests in a timely manner

Esther C.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

14 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They were very helpful, and they were able to come in a timely manner to help with the problem.

They were very helpful, and they were able to come in a timely manner to help with the problem.

Wayne O.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

15 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They do a great job.

They showed up on time, they did everything they said they would do, and they were priced fairly.

Carol L.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

16 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

If they need help with problems in their garden, call him. He is very knowledgeable, and he cares about the environment.

That he cares about the environment

John J.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

17 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I'd recommend them.

They got rid of my pests.

Nancy W.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

18 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty No
CRITIQUE

I would have to say that they seem to know their business very well, but they're like, upscale. I was looking for something a little more affordable for the day to day. They were good, they came out right away, they did it, and they guaranteed their work, but I need something year round that's more affordable. But, on a one-time basis, they're great.

They were very prompt. They came out within a couple days.

Pat B.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

19 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

Well, if someone asked me, I would recommend them.

They were easy to use and convenient, just great.

Colleen L.

VERIFIED Gingrich Horticulture Service CUSTOMER

20 of 200

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They got rid of my critters.

They came out and did the job.

Read All 200 Survey Responses at Ratings View