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Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations

Diamond Certified Company Report

Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations

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CUSTOMER SATISFACTION i
Customer LOYALTY i
Helpful Expertise i
Company Credentials i
  • Workers Compensation
  • Liability Insurance
  • License Verification
  • Business Practices
  • Current Complaint File
Phone SURVEY RESPONSES FROM 572 VERIFIED CUSTOMERS i

Anita D.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

1 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

It is a very good place. They are trustworthy. They take very good care of your animal friends.

Very friendly, caring, a very attentive staff and doctors, I couldn't ask for more.

Ian Y.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

2 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I have recommended everybody I know to go there.

They are very caring and very knowledgeable. They are the first veterinarians that have been able to take care of my basset's problem.

Shawnie T.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

3 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They love animals, and they are very personable with the companions.

They are approachable and trustworthy.

Read All 572 Survey Responses at Ratings View
Diamond certified VIDEO PROFILE
Diamond certified company PROFILE

Howard Schutzman, DVM

Antioch Veterinary Hospital provides routine preventative care for young, healthy pets; early detection and treatment of disease for older pets; and complete medical and surgical care for pets of all ages at two full-service facilities in Antioch. Advanced diagnostic and treatment services include therapeutic laser therapy, electrocardiography, digital radiography, laser surgery, endoscopy, bronchoscopy, video otoscopy and ultrasound. It’s one of the few veterinary hospitals equipped to handle advanced dentistry, and it also offers grooming, boarding, and an outdoor play area.

Serving the Antioch community since 1950, Antioch Veterinary Hospital was acquired in 1985 by Cornell Veterinary School  graduates Dr. Howard Schutzman and Dr. Arnold Gutlaizer. A team of associate veterinarians who have unique areas of expertise “excel at giving people and their pets the care and attention they deserve,” says Dr. Schutzman.

Antioch Veterinary Hospital also offers internal medicine consultation, major and minor surgery, dietary and behavioral counseling, puppy classes, and obedience training. For the convenience of its clients, the hospital is open for extended evening and weekend hours.

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DIAMOND CERTIFIED RESEARCHED CAPABILITIES ON Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations

COMPANY CONTACT
Locations

Alameda County
Contra Costa County
Hayward
Berkeley
Fremont
Oakland
Richmond
Antioch
Concord
Walnut Creek

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SERVICES PERFORMED

Pet Care
Laser Surgery
Bronchoscopy
Video Otoscopy, Endoscopy and Ultrasound
Boarding
Professional Grooming
Puppy and Obedience Classes

BRANDS Supported
  • Comfortis

  • Heartgard

  • Revolution

  • Rimadyl

  • Frontline Plus

  • Metacam

  • ProHeart

  • Science Diet

  • Vectra

DIAMOND CERTIFIED RESEARCHED ARTICLES ON Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations

Company Profile

Antioch Veterinary Hospital provides routine preventative care for young, healthy pets; early detection and treatment of disease for older pets; and complete medical and surgical care for pets of all ages at two full-service facilities in Antioch. Advanced diagnostic and treatment services include therapeutic laser therapy, electrocardiography, digital radiography, laser surgery, endoscopy, bronchoscopy, video otoscopy and ultrasound. It’s one of the few veterinary hospitals equipped to handle advanced dentistry, and it also offers grooming, boarding, and an outdoor play area.

Serving the Antioch community since 1950, Antioch Veterinary Hospital was acquired in 1985 by Cornell Veterinary School  graduates Dr. Howard Schutzman and Dr. Arnold Gutlaizer. A team of associate veterinarians who have unique areas of expertise “excel at giving people and their pets the care and attention they deserve,” says Dr. Schutzman.

Antioch Veterinary Hospital also offers internal medicine consultation, major and minor surgery, dietary and behavioral counseling, puppy classes, and obedience training. For the convenience of its clients, the hospital is open for extended evening and weekend hours.

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Company Philosophy

“We aim to do all we can to exceed our clients’ expectations for professional veterinary service. Our doctors are thorough and gentle, and they genuinely care about their patients. They listen to each client’s concerns and encourage them to ask questions so they fully understand everything pertaining to their pet’s condition and care. We understand the special roles pets play in families, and we’re dedicated to becoming an active partner in their health care.”

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Comparative Summary

Veterinary clinics are always looking for ways to distinguish themselves from their competition, and those that have earned the prestigious Diamond Certified award are already several steps ahead. In addition to its Diamond Certified status, Antioch Veterinary Hospital sets itself apart by combining numerous services that would otherwise only be found at specialist clinics and offering them under one roof. “We’re truly a full-service hospital,” confirms owner Dr. Howard Schutzman. “In addition to handling everything from routine exams to complex medical and surgical cases, we offer special services including boarding, grooming, and agility and obedience classes. It’s a rare combination that allows us to care for our customers’ pets in any way they need.”

Antioch Veterinary Hospital has been providing preventative care for young, healthy pets; early detection and treatment of disease for older pets; and complete medical and surgical care for pets of all ages at two full-service facilities in Antioch since 1985. The company is one of the few veterinary hospitals equipped to handle advanced dentistry, and it also offers state-of-the-art technology such as therapeutic laser therapy, electrocardiography, digital and dental radiography, laser surgery, endoscopy, bronchoscopy, video otoscopy and ultrasonography.

“Our beautiful, centrally located facility is more than just a full-service small animal hospital,” adds Dr. Schutzman. “It’s also a place from which we can serve East County residents with a monthly public lecture series covering a wide range of veterinary topics, school tours, college scholarships, high school shadow programs, RVT externships, retirement home pet health care visits, and an adoption center provided gratis to local rescue organizations and clients.”

Antioch Veterinary Hospital believes in offering highly personalized service that makes each client feel more comfortable about their pet’s health situation. “We pride ourselves on being fully accessible to our clients from the minute they walk in until they leave with their pets,” says Dr. Schutzman. “Our goal is to make sure each client has a positive experience that motivates them to return any time they have concerns about their pet’s health.”

In addition to its implementation of cutting-edge technology, Antioch Veterinary Hospital uses a web-based and mail-in survey system that’s designed to collect valuable feedback from clients. “Our online survey asks specific questions about how long the customer waited on hold, how long it took to get into the exam room, how the doctor and technician performed, and so on,” explains Dr. Schutzman. “Our clients can leave comments on the site as well, and we take those into consideration so we can address specific concerns and adjust our services to provide a better overall experience.”

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Industry Info

Pet medical care is as much about preventive maintenance as it is about illness treatment. The first step in caring for your pet’s medical needs is building a good relationship with a trusted veterinarian. It’s important to choose a veterinarian before your pet gets sick—not only is it difficult to find the right person on short notice, but a new doctor will have no history of dealing with your pet. When choosing a veterinarian, look for the following:

• Is the facility clean, comfortable and well organized?
• How many veterinarians are in the practice? If there are multiple veterinarians, you’re more likely to be seen quickly in an emergency.
• Is the staff courteous and communicative?
• Do the veterinarians have special interests? Are they interests you’re likely to need?
• Are x-rays, ultrasound, blood work, EKGs, endoscopy, and other advanced diagnostics done in-house, or will you need to go to a specialist?
• Does the veterinarian provide 24-hour emergency service? If not, identify the closest 24-hour emergency clinic.

In addition to annual exams and vaccinations, other preventive steps go a long way toward keeping your pet healthy. Unless you intend to breed your pet, get it spayed or neutered. Not only does this reduce the number of unwanted puppies and kittens, but pets that have been spayed or neutered are healthier and live longer. Also, weight management is very important. Ensure your pet eats a healthy diet and gets sufficient exercise. Pets that exercise regularly have better mental attitudes and fewer behavioral and medical issues.

Parasite control is necessary year-round in California. Intestinal worms can make pets ill (especially young puppies and kittens), but they also present a significant health hazard to humans. Regular fecal testing and worm medications will keep your pets and family safe from these parasites. Properly dosed flea preventatives are essential. “You don’t want to wait until your home is infested,” says Dr. Howard Schutzman, owner of Antioch Veterinary Hospital. “That can mean thousands of fleas in your house.” A variety of treatments are available, both topical and oral. If you have a pet that has been exposed to ticks, you need a medication to deal with them. Heartworm preventative medication can be lifesaving. All it takes is one bite from an infected mosquito to transmit a potentially fatal case of heartworm to both dogs and cats.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What’s involved in a spay/neuter procedure?

A: Typically, the procedures include a pre-operation examination, any vaccines that may be due, a pre-anesthetic EKG and in-house mini panel (blood work), pre-anesthetic pain and anti-inflammatory injections, IV catheter, anesthesia, hospitalization, pain and anti-inflammatory medicines and antibiotics (if needed), and an e-collar to prevent the animal from disturbing the incision site. It’s also possible to apply fluoride to help prevent cavities and micro-chipping to permanently identify pets in case they’re lost. Before any work is done, all these options are reviewed with the owner and an exact plan is chosen to meet the patient’s individual needs.

Q: Can you tell me how much certain services cost over the phone?

A: We can tell you the fees of things like routine exams, vaccinations and spay/neuter procedures, but many of our services are based on the specific needs of the animals we see, so it’s difficult to give an exact price quote over the phone without first examining your pet. We can give you an idea of what to expect based on your pet’s symptoms, but it’s a lot easier after we’ve conducted a proper examination. We’ll spend as much time as needed to ensure you fully understand all the options available to you.

Q: Do you offer competitive prices?

A: Absolutely. We’re very competitive when it comes to medical fees, so we rarely encounter a situation where we have to explain why we’re more expensive than another practice.

Q: Are you open on weekends?

A: Yes, and that’s very important to our clients. When someone can’t get their pet into the hospital during an emergency, it can be a very stressful situation for everyone involved, so we make sure we have enough doctors and support staff to stay open weekends.

Q: Do you offer boarding services?

A: Yes, we offer boarding services at both our locations, and our Deer Valley facility even has an outdoor play yard. We’ll take good care of your pet in our clean, comfortable facilities so you can enjoy a worry-free vacation.

Q: Do you offer grooming services?

A: Yes. Our Deer Valley location features an expert groomer who is onsite Tuesday through Saturday to attend to every detail of your pet’s grooming needs, from routine bathing and nail clipping to brush-outs and specialized breed cuts. To schedule an appointment for your pet, please call (925) 452-7997.

Q: Do you accept pet health insurance?

A: Absolutely. Pet health insurance helps meet any expenses due to an unexpected illness or injury. It’s easy and affordable, and you’ll have peace of mind knowing you can always care for your pet. Our staff can provide you with more information about specific types of insurance.

Q: Are your facilities environmentally-friendly?

A: We try to be as environmentally-responsible as possible. Our Deer Valley location has four bioswales, which divert rainwater to certain areas of our parking lots and remove oils, toxins and other harmful substances before entering the water table. We also have a ‘cool roof,’ which is light-reflective and allows us to use much less electricity to air-condition our building, as well as artificial turf called K-9 grass that’s designed specifically for dogs. Recycling bins are located throughout our hospitals, which help us greatly reduce the load we put on landfills.

Q: When should I have my pet vaccinated?

A: All dogs and cats should begin with a series of booster vaccinations at eight, 12 and 16 weeks of age. Vaccinations should be given every one to three years, with the exception of the bordetella (kennel cough) vaccine that’s given to dogs every six months.

Q: When should I have my pet spayed or neutered?

A: Spaying or neutering can be done at about six months of age. We’ll examine your pet prior to surgery to determine whether it’s healthy enough to undergo the procedure.

Q: What should I expect after having my pet spayed or neutered?

A: Each individual pet is unique, but typically your pet will resume normal eating habits within 24 to 48 hours. Restricted activity is best for 10 to 14 days. If sutures are required, we’ll remove them in 10 to 14 days. If you have questions during the recovery period, don’t hesitate to call us at any time.

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SELECTED PHOTOS FROM Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations

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DIAMOND CERTIFIED EXPERT CONTRIBUTOR ADVICE & TIPS FROM Dr. Howard Schutzman

Expert CONTRIBUTOR PROFILE
  • Dr. Howard Schutzman is a 42-year veteran of the veterinary field and owner of Antioch Veterinary Hospital, a Diamond Certified practice since 2002. He can be reached at (925) 399-1975 or by email.

Dr. Howard Schutzman: Veterinary Vitality

By James Florence, Diamond Certified Program Reporter

ANTIOCH — After four decades in the veterinary field, Dr. Howard Schutzman traces his beginnings to a formative childhood influence. “When I was five years old, I went to visit my second cousin, who was a veterinarian,” he remembers. “His profession made quite an impression on me, and I decided that I wanted to be a veterinarian myself.” Years later, Howard hadn’t lost sight of his vocational aspirations. “After high school, I spent four years at Cornell University, followed by another four years in veterinary school. Upon graduating in 1981, I moved from my home city of New York to the San Francisco Bay Area, where I began working as a veterinarian.”

Not long after relocating to the West Coast, Howard contacted his former veterinary school classmate, Arnie Gutlaizer, and proposed they form a professional partnership. “Arnie and I knew we were compatible because we had worked together in college,” he explains. “We started working together again at a practice in Walnut Creek, during which time we sought an opportunity to open our own.” After three years, the opportunity arrived, and the two partners purchased a practice in Oakland. By the following year, they’d expanded with two additional locations in Antioch. “In just a few months, we went from owning nothing to owning three hospitals, without any prior experience running a business! It was a little nerve-wracking, but it was also very exciting.”

It may have been a big risk, but to Howard and Arnie’s relief, it was a risk that paid off—within a short time, their business began to show signs of exponential growth. “When we first started, we had less than 10 employees, and today, we have more than 70,” says Dr. Schutzman. “We actually won a national design award for our hospital in Deer Valley, which we built four years ago.”

Today, after three decades as owner of Antioch Veterinary Hospital, Dr. Schutzman says he enjoys multiple aspects of his job. “One great thing about being a veterinarian is the variety. On any given day, I can go from examining a cute puppy or kitten to performing a major surgical procedure, so it’s hard to get bored. I also enjoy the management aspect. From working with our employees to keeping the practice vital, I take a lot of pride in maintaining our exceptionally high standard of care.”

In addition to the fundamental components of his job, Dr. Schutzman enjoys utilizing his practice for charitable purposes. “Giving back is really important to me,” he affirms. “Whether it’s providing low-cost spay and neuter clinics for local rescue organizations or facilitating tours for students, we make a sincere effort to stay involved with our community. We also hold an annual essay contest through which we give scholarships to four students. That’s something I find especially rewarding—it’s very touching to read these students’ essays and hear their stories.”

Outside of work, Howard enjoys a number of active pastimes, from working out and playing poker to following his favorite sports team. “I’m a rabid Golden State Warriors fan,” he says. “I’ve had season tickets for 12 years now, so no one can accuse me of being a fair-weather fan!” Additionally, he enjoys spending time with his family, including his wife, Theresa, their three adult children and his own parents. “My parents are both in their 90s, so I’m very intentional about spending time with them these days,” he says. “I actually have a ritual with my father where I take him grocery shopping every weekend.”

In regard to his professional career, Dr. Schutzman says the veterinary field is just as much about people as it is about animals. “People often say to me, ‘You’re a vet, you must love animals,’ which is true, but it’s even more important for a veterinarian to like working with people. Whatever treatment or procedure you prescribe, you always have to go through the animal’s owner, so if you don’t have the ability to communicate with people, you’re going to have a hard time being successful.”

When asked the first thing he’d do if he could retire tomorrow, Dr. Schutzman says he wouldn’t. “I’m not going to retire for quite a while because the job is still too interesting to me. Even as I come to a point where I’m less able to do the physically demanding parts of my job, I’m shifting more of my attention to the management side. When I do eventually retire, I’ll probably travel more and spend more time with my kids, but I don’t see that happening any time soon.”

Ask Me Anything!

Q: What was your first pet?
A: A mixed-breed Spaniel named Misty.

Q: Did you play any sports in high school?
A: I played basketball.

Q: Are you fluent in any foreign languages?
A: I took six years of French, and the answer is “no.” (Laughs)

Q: What’s your favorite holiday?
A: Thanksgiving—the whole family gets together, but there isn’t any pressure to pick out gifts for people.

Q: Are you an early bird or a night owl?
A: Both. I stay up late and get up early.

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Expert articles
  • Caring for Your Pet’s Dental Health

    ANTIOCH — Periodontal disease is a common condition found in dogs and cats—in fact, 70 to 80 percent exhibit symptoms by the time they reach three years of age. The most basic form of periodontal disease is gingivitis, which is an infection in the gums. If caught early, this condition can be easily treated, but if left unchecked, it can lead to infection of the deeper structures that support the teeth. This can result in problems like pockets, loose teeth and loss of bone, and in severe cases, it can allow bacteria to enter the bloodstream, which can damage vital organs like the heart and kidneys.

    To prevent this detrimental progression, you need to be proactive about caring for your pet’s oral health. The simplest way to do this is to brush or wipe its teeth and gums daily—just make sure you’re using a product that’s specifically designed for dogs or cats.

    In addition to caring for your pet’s dental health, keep an eye out for indicators of periodontal problems. The most basic red flag is bad breath: while most people assume dogs’ breath is naturally bad, it’s actually a sign of bacteria developing in the mouth. Other signs include swollen, red or bleeding gums; a swelling or discharge from beneath the eye (a symptom of a deep, abscessed tooth); hesitancy or difficulty eating; and an uncharacteristic disinterest in playing with chew toys.

    If your pet is diagnosed with periodontal disease during a routine checkup, it’s highly recommended that a full oral evaluation be conducted, which includes dental x-rays taken under anesthesia. By allowing your veterinarian to evaluate the disease both above and below the gum line, x-rays will help determine an appropriate treatment.

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  • The Importance of Routine Pet Checkups

    ANTIOCH — Many pet owners take an “as needed” approach to veterinary visits, but just like with human checkups, this can have negative consequences. A better plan is to bring in your pet for regularly scheduled checkups.

    Ongoing exams are important because pets often don’t exhibit outward signs of illness or injury. Not only that, your own observations can be misleading, as what you perceive to be a particular symptom may be something else entirely. For example, if your old dog has trouble climbing stairs, you might assume he has arthritis, but it actually may be a sign of heart disease. If you find a small growth on your pet, you might not think it’s a big deal, but it could be life-threatening melanoma. Even a young puppy or kitten can have a birth defect such as a cleft palette or heart murmur that can only be detected by a professional. By taking a proactive approach, your veterinarian will be able to catch issues early rather than in their advanced stages.

    So, how often should you bring your pet to the vet? It depends on its age—for younger animals, an annual checkup will suffice, but older pets should come in every six months. Keep in mind that what constitutes “older” varies by breed: for cats and smaller dogs, this will be in the early teen years, whereas a large breed dog is considered older by age eight.

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Expert video tip
  • Video: Laser Treatment for Pets

    Complete Video Transcription:

    ANTIOCH — Host, Sarah Rutan: If your pet is experiencing chronic arthritis, urinary tract infections or another painful condition, therapeutic laser treatment can be a beneficial option. To learn more, we’re in Antioch with Dr. Brie Duff of Antioch Veterinary Hospital, speaking on behalf of Diamond Certified Expert Contributor Dr. Howard Schutzman.

    Dr. Brie Duff: If your pet is experiencing something like chronic arthritis, pain or trauma, chronic urinary tract infections, or even skin disease, whether it’s focal area or throughout the body, then therapeutic laser would definitely benefit your pet.

    What it’s going to do is decrease inflammation, decrease pain, and increase healing times. And all of it is non-invasive and doesn’t cause any side effects. And it can use, in addition – most of the time we use it in addition to other medications, as well. Or if your pet can’t tolerate certain medications, then this is a great way to steer away from those and do something that is, you know, not going to cause any side effects.

    What you’re going to expect when you come into a hospital of clinic that is offering therapeutic laser therapy, is the veterinarian, we will do a thorough exam and talk to you about what the treatment plan will be, which includes the therapeutic laser therapy. And then when you’re going to be getting that, a veterinary technician will be performing that with you in the room. And your pet will not have to be sedated; will just be laying there as the therapy is occurring.

    Host, Sarah Rutan: To learn more from local, top-rated companies, visit our Diamond Certified Expert Reports at experts.diamondcertified.org.

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  • Video: Laser Treatment for Pets

    Complete Video Transcription:

    ANTIOCH — Host, Sarah Rutan: If your pet is experiencing chronic arthritis, urinary tract infections or another painful condition, therapeutic laser treatment can be a beneficial option. To learn more, we’re in Antioch with Dr. Brie Duff of Antioch Veterinary Hospital, speaking on behalf of Diamond Certified Expert Contributor Dr. Howard Schutzman.

    Dr. Brie Duff: If your pet is experiencing something like chronic arthritis, pain or trauma, chronic urinary tract infections, or even skin disease, whether it’s focal area or throughout the body, then therapeutic laser would definitely benefit your pet.

    What it’s going to do is decrease inflammation, decrease pain, and increase healing times. And all of it is non-invasive and doesn’t cause any side effects. And it can use, in addition – most of the time we use it in addition to other medications, as well. Or if your pet can’t tolerate certain medications, then this is a great way to steer away from those and do something that is, you know, not going to cause any side effects.

    What you’re going to expect when you come into a hospital of clinic that is offering therapeutic laser therapy, is the veterinarian, we will do a thorough exam and talk to you about what the treatment plan will be, which includes the therapeutic laser therapy. And then when you’re going to be getting that, a veterinary technician will be performing that with you in the room. And your pet will not have to be sedated; will just be laying there as the therapy is occurring.

    Host, Sarah Rutan: To learn more from local, top-rated companies, visit our Diamond Certified Expert Reports at experts.diamondcertified.org.

    Read moreRead less
  • Video: Laser Treatment for Pets

    Complete Video Transcription:

    ANTIOCH — Host, Sarah Rutan: If your pet is experiencing chronic arthritis, urinary tract infections or another painful condition, therapeutic laser treatment can be a beneficial option. To learn more, we’re in Antioch with Dr. Brie Duff of Antioch Veterinary Hospital, speaking on behalf of Diamond Certified Expert Contributor Dr. Howard Schutzman.

    Dr. Brie Duff: If your pet is experiencing something like chronic arthritis, pain or trauma, chronic urinary tract infections, or even skin disease, whether it’s focal area or throughout the body, then therapeutic laser would definitely benefit your pet.

    What it’s going to do is decrease inflammation, decrease pain, and increase healing times. And all of it is non-invasive and doesn’t cause any side effects. And it can use, in addition – most of the time we use it in addition to other medications, as well. Or if your pet can’t tolerate certain medications, then this is a great way to steer away from those and do something that is, you know, not going to cause any side effects.

    What you’re going to expect when you come into a hospital of clinic that is offering therapeutic laser therapy, is the veterinarian, we will do a thorough exam and talk to you about what the treatment plan will be, which includes the therapeutic laser therapy. And then when you’re going to be getting that, a veterinary technician will be performing that with you in the room. And your pet will not have to be sedated; will just be laying there as the therapy is occurring.

    Host, Sarah Rutan: To learn more from local, top-rated companies, visit our Diamond Certified Expert Reports at experts.diamondcertified.org.

    Read moreRead less
  • Video: Laser Treatment for Pets

    Complete Video Transcription:

    ANTIOCH — Host, Sarah Rutan: If your pet is experiencing chronic arthritis, urinary tract infections or another painful condition, therapeutic laser treatment can be a beneficial option. To learn more, we’re in Antioch with Dr. Brie Duff of Antioch Veterinary Hospital, speaking on behalf of Diamond Certified Expert Contributor Dr. Howard Schutzman.

    Dr. Brie Duff: If your pet is experiencing something like chronic arthritis, pain or trauma, chronic urinary tract infections, or even skin disease, whether it’s focal area or throughout the body, then therapeutic laser would definitely benefit your pet.

    What it’s going to do is decrease inflammation, decrease pain, and increase healing times. And all of it is non-invasive and doesn’t cause any side effects. And it can use, in addition – most of the time we use it in addition to other medications, as well. Or if your pet can’t tolerate certain medications, then this is a great way to steer away from those and do something that is, you know, not going to cause any side effects.

    What you’re going to expect when you come into a hospital of clinic that is offering therapeutic laser therapy, is the veterinarian, we will do a thorough exam and talk to you about what the treatment plan will be, which includes the therapeutic laser therapy. And then when you’re going to be getting that, a veterinary technician will be performing that with you in the room. And your pet will not have to be sedated; will just be laying there as the therapy is occurring.

    Host, Sarah Rutan: To learn more from local, top-rated companies, visit our Diamond Certified Expert Reports at experts.diamondcertified.org.

    Read moreRead less
Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations WEBSITE AND EXTERNAL FEED
  • Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations SOCIAL MEDIA FEEDS
Diamond Certified RATINGS ON Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations
Diamond certified ratings dashboard
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION i
Customer LOYALTY i
Helpful Expertise i

Each surveyed customer was asked, “If you needed any helpful expertise, did this company provide that expertise?” To calculate this score, total “Yes” responses were divided by total responses (excluding those that stated they hadn’t needed any expertise).

Company Credentials i
  • Workers Compensation
  • Liability Insurance
  • License Verification
  • Business Practices
  • Current Complaint File
Phone SURVEY RESPONSES FROM 572 VERIFIED CUSTOMERS i
Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations : Average 9.3 out of 10 based on 572 unique customer surveys of customer satisfaction.

Anita D.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

1 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

It is a very good place. They are trustworthy. They take very good care of your animal friends.

Very friendly, caring, a very attentive staff and doctors, I couldn't ask for more.

Ian Y.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

2 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I have recommended everybody I know to go there.

They are very caring and very knowledgeable. They are the first veterinarians that have been able to take care of my basset's problem.

Shawnie T.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

3 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They love animals, and they are very personable with the companions.

They are approachable and trustworthy.

Lisa D.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

4 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

The customer service is great. The appointments are within a reasonable amount of time. They are clean and on time.

The doctors and the staff are very caring, and I also like the fact that they send out reminders.

Ronald M.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

5 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I've had good luck with them.

They treat my dogs well, and they treat me well.

Natalie S.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

6 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I would recommend them.

They got right to work with x-rays. This was an emergency. We used to live in Antioch, but now we live in the mountains. They really did a great job for my dog.

Dave R.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

7 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They provide great service with a good result.

Cleanliness

Dina R.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

8 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

The staff is knowledgeable and great with the animals.

I like my doctor.

Nicole T.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

9 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I would say to take your pet there. They are very knowledgeable, and the doctors and staff are great. It took me a while to find a veterinarian that I was comfortable with, and they fit the bill.

The staff and the doctors are up to date with the current procedures and treatments.

Liliana F.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

10 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They are friendly, and their prices are reasonable.

The doctors really explain everything to you.

Jeff K.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

11 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They are very good with the animals.

When we call them, they usually call back in a reasonable amount of time. They are very responsive and flexible.

Jesse M.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

12 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They are very good with animals, and they truly care about what they do.

The staff is really great.

Barbara W.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

13 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I would tell people to go there. I had a great doctor for my dogs. They are clean, nice, and they do exceptional work.

I like everything about them.

Joe A.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

14 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I would tell people to take their animals to them. Actually, Pittsburgh is cheaper, but we've always taken them to 10th Street.

They help you get through the loss of your pet.

Barbara B.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

15 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They were expensive, but worth it.

They attended to the situation immediately. It was an urgent situation. They saved my cat's life.

Belinda O.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

16 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

We have two kittens with a few concerns. They let us know what our concerns should be. I would tell them that they will get excellent service.

The way they care, it shows they concern.

Louise C.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

17 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They are good, caring people.

They listened and took great care of my animal.

Marissa M.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

18 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I felt like they had a clean office and a great staff.

Their honesty, even though it wasn

Steve S.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

19 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

They were knowledgeable.

Probably their diagnosis

Kathy B.

VERIFIED Antioch Veterinary Hospital – 2 Locations CUSTOMER

20 of 572

Quality 10
10 10
Loyalty Yes
CRITIQUE

I would recommend others take their pets there. It's clean, and the staff is awesome.

The clean rooms and waiting area.

Read All 572 Survey Responses at Ratings View