Tree Service

Simon Tunnicliffe is a 29-year veteran of the tree service industry and owner of West Valley Arborists, Inc., a Diamond Certified company since 2010. He can be reached at (408) 827-8933 or by email.

Deep Root Fertilization

Posted on July 11, 2017 by admin

CAMPBELL — Like any plant, trees require nutrients to grow and flourish. While trees typically derive nutrients from the soil, under certain circumstances they may not be able to get adequate nutrition, which can put them in a state of stress. This can occur when trees are situated near lawns or in areas of dense vegetation, where competition for water, nutrients and minerals is intensified. In cases of extreme nutrient deficiency, a good remedial measure is deep root fertilization.

Deep root fertilization utilizes hydraulic injection to deliver nutrients directly into the soil at the tree’s root level. The nutrients are conveyed in the form of a liquefied solution, which makes it easier for the roots to absorb them. Read more

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Video: Deep Root Fertilization

Posted on July 11, 2017 by admin

CAMPBELL — Host, Sarah Rutan: When it comes to caring for the trees on your property, one healthful measure to consider is deep root fertilization. Today we’re in Campbell with Diamond Certified Expert Contributor Simon Tunnicliffe of West Valley Arborists to learn more.

Diamond Certified Expert Contributor, Simon Tunnicliffe: One of the services that we offer here at West Valley Arborist is deep root fertilizing of trees. And the reason we do this is we like to replenish the trees with nutrients and minerals that are already in the soil. So, the way we do this is the hydraulic soil liquid injection method. And as you can see here, Read more

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The Five D’s of Tree Pruning

Posted on July 11, 2017 by admin

WALNUT CREEK – Knowing how to prune a tree is important, but it’s equally important to know what to prune. The simplest way to approach this is to look for branches that fall into one of the following categories: dead, dying, diseased, deranged or de-located. By remembering the five D’s, you’ll be able to prune for maximum tree health and beauty.

While dead and dying branches are easy to recognize by their dark, dried-up appearance and texture, a diseased branch can be a little trickier to identify. For example, “fire blight” is a common disease that affects pome fruit trees (pear, quince and apple, among others) and is manifested by a burnt appearance on leaves and branches. Read more

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Video: Does My Tree Have Sudden Oak Death?

Posted on July 11, 2017 by admin

SAN ANSELMO — Host, Sarah Rutan: If you’ve identified signs of Sudden Oak Death on your oak tree, it’s possible that you’ve confused these symptoms with those of a much less alarming condition. Today we’re in San Anselmo with Diamond Certified Expert Contributor James Cairnes of World Tree Service to learn more.

Diamond Certified Expert Contributor, James Cairnes: Something that I’m frequently asked is: Does my beautiful oak tree have sudden oak death? So, I’d like to just put your mind at rest, hopefully, that there is another similar disease, which is very common, and is not a problem for the oak trees. So, the sudden oak death at first, Read more

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Does My Tree Have Sudden Oak Death?

Posted on July 11, 2017 by admin

SAN ANSELMO — Sudden oak death has been a major problem in California for years, and it continues to concern property owners statewide. In some cases, however, what people perceive to be symptoms of this disease actually denote a much less alarming condition.

One of the most obvious signs of sudden oak death is a black staining of the lower part of the tree trunk—a thick, sticky substance with a sweet odor, similar to wine. What few people realize is there’s another tree condition that exhibits similar symptoms: bacterial wetwood (also known as slime flux). Bacterial wetwood is basically a fermented, slimy bacterial liquid that oozes from a crack or wound on a tree’s exterior and leaves vertical streaks as it runs down the side of the trunk. Read more

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Identifying and Treating Fire Blight in Trees

Posted on July 11, 2017 by admin

CONCORD — Fire blight is a growing concern among Bay Area property owners. It’s a bacterial disease that affects both ornamental and fruiting varieties of pear and apple trees (along with several other closely-related plants), and it’s so named because of the burnt appearance it gives to the affected areas of a plant.

Fire blight can be spread a number of ways. One major carrier is honeybees, which inadvertently carry it on their feet and transfer it to flowers during spring pollination. The disease can then progress from that flower into the plant tissue, moving down from the tops of the trees into the bigger branches.

The main way to prevent the further dissemination of fire blight is to prune it out as soon as it’s spotted. Read more

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The Benefits of Proper Tree Maintenance

Posted on July 11, 2017 by admin

LIVERMORE — The upkeep of trees on a property is an important yet often overlooked aspect of home maintenance. In addition to having their health periodically assessed by a professional, you should keep your trees well-trimmed via regular pruning and periodic canopy thinning.

Thinning the canopy of a tree typically consists of removing elements like deadwood, cross branches and excess growth. In addition to improving a tree’s ventilation (allowing wind to pass through the tree more freely), thinning results in weight reduction, which lessens the strain on a tree’s trunk and roots. Furthermore, thinning a tree’s canopy increases sunlight exposure to its interior branches and your overall property.

When it comes to trees growing near your home, Read more

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