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Why Trust Diamond Certified Audiologists Rated Highest in Quality?

A local audiologist at a Diamond Certified audiology clinic holds popular examples of hearing aids and hearing devices. You'll feel confident choosing a quality audiology center listed above because each has been rated Highest in Quality and has earned Diamond Certified. Read the following articles for more information on how best to choose and work with an audiologist in Alameda County. Photo: Better Hearing Center of Berkeley (2012) Topic: Finding High Quality Audiologists in Alameda County

You are the customer. If your goal is to choose an audiology center that will deliver high customer satisfaction and quality, you’ll feel confident in choosing a Diamond Certified audiologist. Each has been rated Highest in Quality in the most accurate ratings process anywhere. And you’re always backed by the Diamond Certified Performance Guarantee. Here’s why the Diamond Certified ratings and certification process will help you find a top-rated audiology clinic and is unparalleled in its accuracy, rigor and usefulness:

1) Accuracy: All research is performed by live telephone interviews that verify only real customers are surveyed, so you'll never be fooled by fake reviews.

2) Statistical Reliability: A large random sample of past customers is surveyed on an ongoing basis so the research results you see truly reflect a Diamond Certified company’s top-rated status.

3) Full Disclosure: By clicking the name of a company above you'll see the exact rating results in charts and read verbatim survey responses as well as researched articles on each qualified company.

4) Guaranteed: Your purchase is backed up with mediation and the Diamond Certified Performance Guarantee, so you can choose with confidence.

Click on the name of a Diamond Certified company above to read ratings results, researched articles and verbatim customer survey responses to help you make an informed decision.

More than 200,000 customers of local companies have been interviewed in live telephone calls, and only companies that score Highest in Quality in customer satisfaction–a 90+ on a 100 scale–as well as pass all of the credential-based ratings earn Diamond Certified. By requiring such a high score to qualify, the Diamond Certified program eliminates mediocre and poorly performing companies. Read detailed information about the ratings and certification process.

 

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DIAMOND CERTIFIED EXPERT CONTRIBUTORS IN THE Alameda County – Audiologist CATEGORY

Jonathan Lipschutz is a 22-year veteran of the audiology field and owner of Berkeley Hearing Center, a Diamond Certified company since 2014. He can be reached at (510) 398-0699 or by email.

Jonathan Lipschutz

diamond certified contributor profile and expert article

Jonathan Lipschutz: Patient-Centered

By James Florence, Diamond Certified Program Reporter

BERKELEY — As a young paramedic, Jonathan Lipschutz knew he wanted to move up in the medical field, but he wasn’t sure which direction he should go. It wasn’t until a chance interaction with someone from his past that he discovered his intended path. “Soon after I started working as a paramedic, I realized there wasn’t a lot of room for professional growth, so I began to contemplate my options,” he recounts. “One day at work, I ran into my old baseball coach, who was an audiology professor at Purdue University. He suggested I come by his office and talk to him about audiology, which I did later on that week. After learning a bit about the field and how dramatically it could improve people’s lives, I knew it was a perfect fit.”

Today, as owner of Berkeley Hearing Center, Jonathan says he finds his job rewarding on numerous levels. “In addition to being a music lover, I’m a big believer in the idea that communication is the key to resolving conflict. As an audiologist, I have the opportunity to help people reconnect with the world, both in terms of communicating with others and enjoying auditory sensations like music.”

A resident of Berkeley (where he lives with his wife, Anna, and their daughter, Tessa), Jonathan expresses his love for the Bay Area. “The first time I visited the Bay Area back in the mid-1980s, I knew it was where I wanted to live,” he remembers. “I love the diversity, weather, food, culture, geography and activities. It’s just a fantastic place.”

Outside of work, Jonathan enjoys taking advantage of the many recreational opportunities available in the Bay Area. “I’m a big music fan, so I like going to see live music at venues like the Fillmore in San Francisco and The Fox Theater in Oakland,” he says. “Additionally, I’m an avid snowboarder, hiker and poker player. I also love to cook, and I’m known among my friends and family for my sushi skills.”

In regard to a professional philosophy, Jonathan says he takes a patient-centered approach to his career. “I’m all about my patients, and as their hearing health care advocate, I strive to provide them with the best care and resources available. This also means being straightforward with them and making sure they get the appropriate treatment for their particular needs.”

When asked the first thing he’d do if he could retire tomorrow, Jonathan says he’d do some extensive traveling. “I’d like to travel the world and experience different cultures. I’d also probably go on some big snowboarding excursions and try to find some untracked powder.”

Ask Me Anything!

Q: Have you ever read a book more than once?
A: I’ve read “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy many times over the years.

Q: Do you have a favorite band or musician?
A: I enjoy a wide range of music, so it’s hard to say. I’m a big fan of jam bands like the Grateful Dead and Phish, but I’d have to say my all-time favorite album is “Kind of Blue” by Miles Davis.

Q: If you could immediately master a musical instrument, what would you choose?
A: The tenor saxophone.

Q: If you could travel anywhere in the world, where would you go?
A: I’d like to go to Southeast Asia to see countries like Vietnam, Thailand, and Papua New Guinea and do some world class diving.

Q: Would you ever skydive?
A: I totally would, but I don’t think my wife would like that.

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The Importance of Preventative Hearing Loss Treatment

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BERKELEY — At least 28 million adults in the United States suffer from hearing loss, a condition that impacts communication and functional ability, which often leads to cognitive decline, depression and an overall decrease in quality of life. However, despite… Read more

Expert Video Tip

Video: Proactive Hearing Loss Treatment

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Complete Video Transcription:

BERKELEY — Host, Sarah Rutan: While many people ignore the symptoms of hearing loss, addressing it proactively can greatly increase the effectiveness of treatment. Today,… Read more

SELECTED PHOTOS FROM THESE TOP RATED COMPANIES

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INDUSTRY INFORMATION AND RESEARCHED ARTICLES BY THE DIAMOND CERTIFIED RESOURCE

General Hearing Instruments
ReSound Hearing Aids
Interton Hearing Aids
Avada Hearing Aids
Beltone Hearing Aid
Bernafon Hearing Aids
Bernafon-Maico
Rexton Hearing Aid
Sebo-Tek
Siemens Hearing Aids
Micro-Tech
Oticon Hearing Aids
Phonak Hearing Aids
Starkey Hearing Aids
Unitron Hearing Aids
Vivatone Hearing Aids
Sonic Innovations
Audibel Hearing Aids
Audina Hearing Aids
AudioSync
Widex Hearing Aids
Zounds Hearing Aids

invisible hearing aids
bone conduction hearing aids
hearing amplifier
hearing aid repair
cochlear implants
hearing aid accessories
half shell hearing aid (HS)
hearing aid battery replacement
new hearing aids
assistive listening devices
advanced noise reduction
full shell hearing aid (FS)
BAHA hearing aid (bone anchored hearing aid)
affordable hearing aid
behind the hear hearing aids (BTE hearing aid)
background noise reduction hearing aids
CIC hearing aids (completely in the canal)
automatic volume control hearing aids
hearing aid batteries
open ear hearing aids
hearing aid replacement
hearing aid supplies
digital hearing aids
analog hearing aids
disposable hearing aids
ITE hearing aids (in the ear hearing aids)

Alameda
Albany
Ashland
Berkeley
Castro Valley
Cherryland
Dublin
Emeryville
Fremont
Hayward
Komandorski Village
Livermore
Mount Eden
Newark
Oakland
Piedmont
Pleasanton
Russell City
San Leandro
San Lorenzo
Sunol
Union City

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94502
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American Academy of Audiology (AAA) (www.audiology.org)
American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) (www.entnet.org)
American Hearing Aid Associates (AHAA) (www.ahaanet.com )
Association of Late-Deafened Adults (ALDA) (www.alda.org )
Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (www.agbell.org)
American Society for Deaf Children (ASDC) (www.deafchildren.org)
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) (www.asha.org)
American Tinnitus Association (ATA) (www.ata.org)
Better Business Bureau (BBB) (www.bbb.com)
Better Hearing Institute (BHI) (www.betterhearing.org)
California Academy of Audiology (CAA) (www.caaud.org)
Cochlear Implant Association, Inc. (CICI) (www.cici.org)
California Speech-Language-Hearing Association (CSHA) (www.csha.org)
California Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA) (www.dca.ca.gov)
Hearing Aid Dispensers Bureau of California (HADBCA) (www.dca.ca.gov/hearingaid)
Hearing Loss Association of America-California State Association (HLAA) (www.hearinglossca.org)
International Hearing Society (HIS) (www.ihsinfo.org)
League for the Hard of Hearing (LHH) (www.lhh.org)
National Board for Certification Hearing Instrument Devices (NBCHIS) (www.hearingnbc.org)
National Hearing Conservation Association (NHCA) (www.hearingconservation.org)
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) (www.nidcd.nih.gov)
National Association of the Deaf (NAD) (www.nad.org)
Sight and Hearing Association (SHA) (www.sightandhearing.org)
Self Help for Hard of Hearing People, Inc (SHHH) (www.hearingloss.org)
Speech-Language Pathology Board of the State of California (SLPAB) (www.slpab.ca.gov)

Know What You Want
Know What You Want from an Audiology Clinic

When selecting an Audiology Clinic in Alameda County, including the cities ofSan Leandro, Alameda, and Union City, there are many factors to consider. Thataudiologist will be evaluating your hearing loss and his/her recommendationwill help determine which hearing device will be best for your particularhearing loss and lifestyle. Write down as much as possible regarding what youare looking for before you begin your research.

  • Do I want a Diamond Certified company that is rated best inquality and backed by the Diamond Certified Guarantee?
  • How important is the distance of the Audiology Clinic from myhome?
  • Will I get a personal copy of my audiological examinations alongwith an explanation of the meaning?
  • How involved will I be in the choice of a hearing device (ifneeded)?
  • Will the Audiology Clinic be able to meet all my hearingneeds?
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What To Ask In Person
Questions to Ask in Person at Alameda County Audiology Centers

After speaking with the audiology center staff on the telephone, you can narrow down your choices of audiologists in Alameda County, including the smaller cities of Castro Valley, Livermore, Emeryville, and Albany.

You will want to choose to interview an audiologist that can best evaluate your hearing health, and then can offer you recommendations and advice to help find the hearing device that will work best for your hearing loss and lifestyle.

For this interview, you will need to bring along a close friend or family member. Two people will hear and remember more.

Here is a list of possible questions for the interview:

  • Is the hearing assessment included in the price of hearing devices?
  • Is there financial assistance available for a hearing assessment and/or hearing aids?
    Help is often available to lower the cost of hearing assessments and hearing aids. Make sure to ask the audiologist for more information and options if you require financial assistance.
  • What kind of training is given with the hearing aids?
    There is more to buying hearing aids than just fitting them to your ears. You actually hear with your brain. When you begin to wear your hearing aids, your brain does not know what to do with sound. You will need aural rehab. Ask what type of education/rehab is available at the clinic.
  • How often will you see the Alameda County audiologist for appointments? If there are any problems, how soon can you see the audiologist?
  • What kind of add-ons are available at the clinic? Don't feel pressured to buy something that you don't need.
    Remember that extras come with a price; however, there are some benefits with those extras. For instance, directional microphones will help you in a noisy place. Feedback cancellation will keep the hearing aid from squealing. Wireless technology can help you cellphones and television. Always remember to consider what you will really need.
  • Is there a discount or a trade-in policy for upgrades?
  • What does the base cost of the hearing device include?
    Ask for a written breakdown of the cost of the hearing device.
  • What brands and models do you specialize in?
  • Can my hearing device be adjusted remotely?
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  • What To Ask References
    Questions for References of Alameda County Audiologists

    It's best to choose a Diamond Certified audiologist clinic in Alameda County because all certified companies have passed an in-depth ratings process that most other local audiologists can't pass. If you want quality from an audiologist clinic in Alameda County and the greater Bay Area, you can have confidence choosing a Diamond Certified company. Diamond Certified reports are available online for all certified companies. And you'll never be fooled by fake reviews. That's because all research is performed in live telephone interviews of actual customers.

    If you can't find a Diamond Certified audiology clinic within reach, you'll have to do some research on your own. Ifyou do, it's wise to call some references provided by your hearing health specialist. Keep in mind, though, that references provided to you by the hearing health specialist are not equal in value to the large random sample ofcustomers surveyed during the Diamond Certified ratings process. That's because references given to customers from companies are cherry-picked instead of randomly selected from all their customers. So the contractors will likely give you a few customers to call that they know are satisfied.

    If you do call references on your own, specifically ask for a list of the company's 10 most recent customers. This will help avoid them giving you the names of only customers they know were satisfied.

    Here is a list of some questions to consider when speaking with references about audiologists:

    • Were you confident about the results of the complete audiology evaluation?
    • Were you confident of the doctor's recommendation of the type of hearing device?
    • Are you happy with the training and aural rehabilitation you are receiving from the audiology clinic?
    • Does the staff take time to make sure you understood your evaluation?
    • If there was a problem with the hearing device, was the warranty honored?
    • Was there a payment plan that worked well for you?
    • Did the audiology clinic and audiologists listen to and communicate with you?
    • Would you recommend this audiologist?
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  • Review Your Options
    Finding a Good Audiologist in Alameda County including the smaller cities of Ashland, Cherryland, Emeryville, and Mount Eden

    The Diamond Certified symbol has been awarded to companies that scored Highest in Quality in an accurate ratings process.

    Your choice of audiology clinic is an important concern. The more expensive clinics do not necessarily mean better service. On the other hand, the less expensive clinics may not provide the all the hearing services you need. It is important to understand that every audiology clinic will be a little different. Ask for a specific checklist of exactly what will be provided with your hearing evaluation.

    So before deciding on the best audiology clinic in Alameda County for you, it's important to consider the following questions.

    • What does the audiology clinic offer that is specific to my hearing needs?
    • What is the quality of the staff at the clinic?
    • Does Medicare provide benefits for this hearing health service?
    • What payment options does the facility offer?
    • Can I obtain financial assistance for hearing devices?
    • Is the audiology clinic devoted to your satisfaction?
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  • How To Work With
    Working with the Alameda County Audiologist

    Your Alameda County audiologist works with individuals who have hearing, balance, and related ear problems. They will examine you and identify your symptoms of hearing loss and other auditory, balance, and related sensory and neural problems.

    After determining the problem, the professional will then assess the nature and extent of the problems, so he/she can help you cope with them. The audiology test will use audiometers, computers, and other testing devices. These devices measure the loudness at which one begins to hear sounds, the ability to distinguish between sounds, and the impact of hearing loss on an person’s everyday life.

    Another point, audiologists use computer equipment to evaluate and diagnose disorders with balance. Audiologists interpret these results and may work with medical, educational, and psychological information to make a diagnosis and determine what treatment to pursue with you and your hearing health.

    It’s important to answer all their questions and listen to their suggestions and observations, just as it’s important for them to listen to you and answer your questions. Ask for an explanation if you don’t understand what the audiological evaluation is telling you or if they are using language and terms you can’t understand. You should completely comprehend the services offered, policies, fees and guarantees before you sign an agreement or leave the clinic.

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  • Be a Good Customer
    How Can You Be a Good Audiology Clinic Customer

    It's the audiology clinic'sresponsibility to make sure you have the best hearing device for your hearingloss and lifestyle. But you play a big part in the success of your hearinghealth, too.

    Here are a few simple steps you can taketo be a good customer when choosing an audiologist in Alameda County, includingthe major cities of Union City, Pleasanton, Newark and Dublin.

    • Be clear and upfront with the audiologist and his/her staff. Let them know what you want from your audiologist, the long-term outcome you're expecting and specific ways they can satisfy your expectations.
    • Remember, a friendly smile goes a long way!
    • Before you choose an audiologist in Alameda County, restate your expectations and goals, and reiterate to the audiology clinic representative your understanding of the agreement. Most problems with local audiology clinic occur because of a breakdown in communication. By being clear about your expectations and theirs, you can avoid most conflicts.
    • Ask your audiologist if you should call to check on the progress or if he will call you with updates.
    • Be sure your service representative has a phone number where they can reach you at all times while they're processing your hearing evaluation and/or hearing device. The work will move along more smoothly if your audiology clinic can reach you for any necessary updates, questions or work authorizations.
    • When your audiologist contacts you, return calls promptly to keep the audiology clinic on schedule.
    • Pay for the audiologist's evaluation and/or hearing device promptly.

    Why would you want to be a good customer? Audiology clinics in Alameda County appreciate customers who are straightforward, honest and easy to work with. Your good customer behavior sets the tone from your end and creates an environment conducive to a goodrelationship. Things may very well go smoother and any problems may be moreeasily resolved.

    Having your hearing evaluated by anaudiologist is very personal. An important part of your satisfaction will bebuilding a relationship with the audiology clinic. Communicate with them openlyand honestly about your expectations from their hearing health services. Callthem with feedback on your level of satisfaction with the services they areproviding. Listen to their advice on how to maintain your hearing device. Also,show your appreciation. Your thanks will encourage their good service.

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Check The Work
Warranties for Hearing Devices In Alameda County

Your hearing device from your Alameda County audiologist will come with a warranty. Warranties for these devices are greatly varied, but all should give you some protection against damage and defect. Be sure to read exactly what is included and what is not included in the warranty.

You should write down and ask these questions about the warranty of the hearing device you choose.

Your hearing device from your Alameda County audiologist will come with a warranty. Warranties for these devices are greatly varied, but all should give you some protection against damage and defect. Be sure to read exactly what is included and what is not included in the warranty.

You should write down and ask these questions about the warranty of the hearing device you choose.

  • How long does the warranty last?
  • After the initial warranty ends, can additional coverage be bought?
  • What parts of hearing device are covered by the warranty?
  • What if the hearing device gets lost?
  • What if the hearing aid get damaged?

All warranties should be provided to you in writing, and your audiologist or audiology clinic staff should be willing to discuss all terms with you so that you completely understand what customer protections your warranty affords.

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Written Warranties
Warranties for Hearing Devices In Alameda County

Your hearing device from your Alameda County audiologist will come with a warranty. Warranties for these devices are greatly varied, but all should give you some protection against damage and defect. Be sure to read exactly what is included and what is not included in the warranty.

You should write down and ask these questions about the warranty of the hearing device you choose.

  • How long does the warranty last?
  • After the initial warranty ends, can additional coverage be bought?
  • What parts of hearing device are covered by the warranty?
  • What if the hearing device gets lost?
  • What if the hearing aid get damaged?

All warranties should be provided to you in writing, and your audiologist or audiology clinic staff should be willing to discuss all terms with you so that you completely understand what customer protections your warranty affords.

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Top 10 Requests
Popular Audiology Services in Alameda County

Audiology clinics in Alameda County, including those that serve the major cities of Oakland, Fremont, Hayward, and Berkeley, provide all types of hearing services. However, some services are more common than others.

The following are the most familiar requests for audiology clinics.

Hearing Aids
An electronic device that amplifies sound to the ear. This device consists of a microphone, amplifier and receiver.

Hearing Tests (Audiometric Evaluation)
A series of tests evaluating the sensitivity on an individual's hearing. These tests are performed by an audiologist using an audiometer.

Online Hearing Tests
There are online screening tests for hearing problems. The results of these tests are for informational purposes only. This will not replace an evaluation by a hearing professional. For accurate measurements of your hearing levels, you should be assessed by an audiologist.

Pediatric Audiologists in Alameda County
An audiologist who provides diagnostic and rehabilitation services to babies and young children having a wide variety of hearing disorders. These professionals can diagnose hearing loss even in the first few weeks of life. This is followed with a comprehensive program of early intervention.

Hearing Centers in Alameda County
A hearing health clinic operated by an audiologist and his staff. They evaluate for hearing disorders and make recommendations for the person's hearing loss and lifestyle.

Hearing Aid Supplies
Your audiology clinic will assist you in find the supplies you need for your hearing aids, such as batteries, hearing aid repair, etc…

Hearing Counseling and Hearing Rehabilitation
After determining your hearing problem, the audiology clinic will set up appointments with a counselor who will assist in adjusting and becoming comfortable with the new hearing device. The counseling and rehab centers will provide individual counseling for each hearing device user and the family. The family's input during this time is important.

Free Hearing Tests in Alameda County
Many providers will provide a hearing screening test that can predict hearing problems. This test should not replace audiometric testing by an audiologist.

Assistive Listening Devices
Devices like alarms, FM systems, or alerting devices that will help individuals accomplish daily tasks.

Hearing Testing Devices
Audiometer, computers, and other devices used to measure the loudness at which you begin to hear sounds, distinguish between sounds, and the impact this loss hearing deficit will have on the person's daily life.

Common Hearing Aid Brand Requests

  • Beltone Hearing Aids
  • Phonak Hearing Aids
  • Rexton Hearing Aids
  • ReSound Hearing Aids
  • Sonic Innovations Hearing Aids
  • Starkey Hearing Aids
  • Unitron Hearing AIds
  • Vivatone Hearing Aids
  • Widex Hearing Aids
  • Zounds Hearing Aids
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Glossary Of Terms
Glossary of Terms for Audiology Clinics and Local Audiologists

acquired deafness
This hearing loss develops in the course of a life, but wasn't present at birth.

American Sign Language (ASL)
Sign language that has its own syntax and grammar. It is used mainly by those who are deaf.

assistive devices
Devices like alarms, alerting devices, or FM systems that are used to assist people with hearing problems to perform daily tasks.

Also known as: assisted hearing devices, assistive hearing devices, assistive devices for the hearing impaired, assistive listening devices, assistive technology devices, hearing devices, products for the hearing impaired, devices for the hearing impaired

audiologist
A health care professional educated to assess a person's hearing loss and other hearing problems (i.e. tinnitus). A variety of procedures are used to check hearing function, then assists in choosing hearing aids and other hearing devices. An audiologist has an advanced doctorate degree.

Also known as: hearing doctor, hearing aid provider, hearing specialist, ear doctor, pediatric audiologist

Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) Test
The ABR test is used to test the hearing of babies and young children, or to test the functioning of the patient's hearing nerve. This is a painless procedure which involves attaching recording disks to the head. It records electrical activity from the hearing nerve and brain stem.

Also known as: auditory brainstem response, ABR hearing test, hearing test, ABR test, auditory brain response test, brainstem auditory evoked response, audiometric testing, newborn hearing test, hearing testing, hearing screening

auditory nerve
The auditory nerve is the eighth cranial nerve. It connects the inner ear to the brain.

Also known as: acoustic nerve, cranial nerve viii, vestibulocochlear nerve, cochlear nerve, 8th cranial nerve, eighth cranial nerve

auditory perception
This is the ability to identify, interpret, and then attach meaning to sound.

Also known as: auditory neuropathy

balance disorder
A disorder that causes a disruption in the labyrinth – the inner ear organ that controls the balance system.

Also known as: inner ear disorders, vertigo symptoms, dizziness, inner ear balance disorders, vestibular balance disorders, inner ear dizziness

Barotraumas
A rapid change of air or water pressure causes this injury to the middle ear.

Also known as: barrow trauma, inner ear barotrauma, ear pressure, ear barotrauma, decompression sickness, pressure in the ears

captioning
Text display of spoken words for deaf or hard of hearing television viewers on a TV screen. This way they can follow the dialogue and the action of a program.

Also known as close captioned, close captioning, open captioning, captioning services, close caption, tv captions, captioned, captions, broadcast captioning

cerumen
Glands secrete this yellow substance in the outer ear canal. This keeps the skin of the ear canal protected from infection and dry.

Also known as: cerumen ear wax, ear wax, excessive cerumen, ear wax blockage, cerumen gland

cochlea
The organ of hearing is contained in this snail shaped structure in the inner ear.

Also known as: semicircular canals, cochlea function, ear cochlea, cochlear inner ear

counseling and rehabilitation
After determining your hearing problem, the audiology clinic will set up appointments with a counselor who will assist in adjusting and becoming comfortable with the new hearing device. The counseling and rehab centers will provide individual counseling for each hearing device user and the family. The family's input during this time is important.

cochlear implant
A device that will be a substitute for damaged hair cells in the inner ear. It is implanted into the cochlea with surgery. It uses an external process to send an electrical signal to the auditory nerve. The user will then perceive sound through the cochlear implant. It is used for severe to profound hearing loss.

conductive hearing loss
A common loss in children where the hearing loss is caused by an abnormal transmission of sound in the outer ear or middle ear.

Also known as: conduction hearing loss, sensor neural hearing loss, mild conductive hearing loss, bilateral conductive hearing loss, unilateral conductive hearing loss

decibel (dB)
A unit used to measure the intensity sound.

Also known as: decibel meter, sound decibel meter, decibel levels, decibel scale, decibel measurement, measuring decibels, decibel meters

dizziness
Unsteadiness physically and imbalance related to balance disorders.

dysequilibrium
Any problem with balance.

ear infection
A problem with the growth of bacteria or viruses in the middle ear.

Also known as: outer ear infection, inner ear infection, fungal ear infection, middle ear infection

free hearing tests
Many providers will provide a hearing screening test that can predict hearing problems. This test should not replace audiometric testing by an audiologist.

hearing aid
An electronic device which amplifies and sends sound to the ear. The three basic parts of a hearing aid are the microphone, the amplifier, and the receiver.

hearing aid supplies
Your audiology clinic will assist you in find the supplies you need for your hearing aids, such as batteries, hearing aid repair, etc…

hearing center
A hearing health clinic operated by an audiologist and his staff. They evaluate for hearing disorders and make recommendations for the person's hearing loss and lifestyle.

Also known as: hearing health center, hearing clinic, hearing assessment center, hearing aid center, hearing specialist, speech and hearing center, center for hearing and communication, hearing testing

hearing tests
A series of tests evaluating the sensitivity on an individual's hearing. These tests are performed by an audiologist using an audiometer.

Also known as: audiometric evaluation

labyrinthitis
A viral or bacterial infection of the inner ear. It can cause dizziness, loss of balance, and temporary hearing loss.

Also known as: inner ear infection, bony labyrinth, viral lybyrinthitis, acute labyrinthitis, vestibular neuritis, osseous labyrinth

middle ear
The part of the ear that includes the eardrum and three tiny bones of the middle ear. This part ends at the oval window that leads to the inner ear.

Also known as: middle ear anatomy, middle ear cavity

online hearing tests
There are online screening tests for hearing problems. The results of these tests are for informational purposes only. This will not replace an evaluation by a hearing professional. For accurate measurements of your hearing levels, you should be assessed by an audiologist.

otologist
Physician/surgeon who specializes in diseases of the ear.

Also known as: otologists, otolaryngologist, audiologist, neuro otologist, nearotologist, ear doctor, neurotology, ontological

pediatric audiologist
An audiologist who provides diagnostic and rehabilitation servies to babies and young children having a wide variety of hearing disorders. These professionals can diagnose hearing loss even in the first few weeks of life. This is followed with a comprehensive program of early intervention.

Also known as: pediatric audiology, audiology, audiologist, hearing doctor, audiology associates, audiology services, hearing doctors, hearing help, pediatric audiology testing

sign language
Method of communication for people who are deaf in which hand movements, gestures, and facial expressions convey grammatical structure and meaning.

testing devices
Audiometer, computers, and other devices used to measure the loudness at which you begin to hear sounds, distinguish between sounds, and the impact this loss hearing deficit will have on the person's daily life.

Also known as: hearing tests, hearing test equipment, hearing devices, hearing loss test, hearing testing equipment, industrial hearing testing, hearing screening test, hearing device, frequency hearing test, hearing test tones, assistive listening devices, hearing screening, hearing test machine, audiogram hearing test

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Frequently Asked Questions
Frequently Asked Questions for Audiologists

Q: Why choose a Diamond Certified Audiologist?
A: Diamond Certified helps you choose an audiologist with confidence by offering a list of top-rated local companies who have passed the country's most in-depth rating process. Only audiology centers rated Highest in Quality earn the prestigious Diamond Certified award. Most companies can't pass the ratings. American Ratings Corporation also monitors every Diamond Certified company with ongoing research and ratings. And your purchase is backed by the Diamond Certified Performance Guarantee. So you'll feel confident choosing a Diamond Certified audiology clinic.

Q: What is an audiologist?
A: Audiologists are trained professionals who can identify, evaluate, diagnose, and treat disorders of hearing. People with possible hearing loss need an audiological exam to decide the type, degree, and cause of the hearing loss. Audiologists provide many services, some of them are:

  • Comprehensive audiological examination
  • Test for balance and dizziness disorders
  • The selection and fitting of listening devices
  • Industries' hearing conservation programs
  • Rehabilitation for hearing disorders
  • Rehabilitation for balance disorders

Q: Why would I need to see an audiologist?
A: These professionals have either a master's degree or a research doctorate degree (Ph.D) or a clinical doctorate degree (Au.D). These degrees will come from accredited universities where they are given special training in preventing, identifying, assessing and rehabilitating people with hearing impairments. Because of this education and certification, an audiologist is the most qualified professional to give hearing tests, distribute hearing aids, and provide rehab for people with auditory problems.

Q: How would I determine if I have a hearing problem?
A: The most exact way to know if you have a hearing problem is to have a hearing evaluation. However you can ask yourself the following questions to confirm a hearing problem: Do you need people to repeat themselves a lot? Do you turn the TV up louder than others need it? Does it seem like people mumble? Is it difficult to hear on the telephone? Is it hard to hear in restaurants or other noisy places? If at least one of those questions is yes, then it could be time for a hearing test.

Q: Will I lose more hearing if I use a hearing aid?
A: Definitely not. Hearing aids will make the level of loudness a comfortable range for you. It has been proven with research that hearing aids actually will help preserve your hearing abilities because they keep the sensory cells in your inner ear active.

Q: How often will I need to replace my hearing aids?
A: How long a hearing will last depends on many different things. Usually, the average life of a hearing aid is 4 to 6 years. One of the important factors is how well the hearing aid is taken care of. They will last longer if you protect them from ear wax and damage from moisture.

Q: Will I need to wear one or two hearing aids?
A: You will need to wear two hearing aids if you have hearing loss in both of your ears. If sound is entering both of your ears, it is louder than if you only heard the sound in one ear. Two hearing aids will improve your ability to locate where sound is coming from. Amplifying both ears is more natural. It also helps the brain if the information receives information from both sides. This is especially helpful when dealing with background noise.

Q: Will insurance cover my hearing aids?
A: There are insurance company plans that will pay for the cost of hearing aids. Some companies may cover a part of the cost. You will need to check with your insurance company to find out your personal coverage for hearing aids.

Medicare will not pay for hearing aids, but they will cover part of the examination costs. You should speak to your audiologist about payment options before your appointment.

Q: What is the youngest age a child can have a hearing evaluation?
A: Audiologists can test all ages of children, even newborn babies. Newborns through toddlers are tested with non-invasive ways that record the brain's response to sound (Auditory Brainstem Response Audiometry n ABR) or the ear's response to sound (Otoacoustic Emissions n OAE). If a child is old enough to decipher where the sound is coming from, they can be tested in a sound booth with visual reinforcement or play audiometry. If a child is 3 years or more, he/she can be tested similar to adults.

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